French Bisque Dolls
    German Bisque Dolls
    Papier Mâchè Dolls
    China & Parian Dolls
    Vintage Dolls 1930-1960
    Earlier Composition Dolls
    Other Antique Dolls

    Cast Iron Toys
    Early American Tin Toys
    European Tin Toys
    Tin Windup Toys
    Still & Mechanical Banks

    Antique Slot Machines
    Antique Trade Stimulators
    Antique Vending Machines
    Antique Arcade Machines

    Comic Bisque Nodders
    Advertising & Cigar Cutters
    Other Items of Interest


       

Other Antique Dolls

 Nancy & Sluggo Cloth Doll by Georgene Novelties, Inc.
A charming set of charactor dolls from the 1940s in their original boxes and still retaining original wrist tags. These dolls probably have never been played with and the only slight distraction is where the box lids rested on the foreheads cousing slight discoloration. Boxes are marked with original prices.
A charming set of charactor dolls from the 1940s in their original boxes and still retaining original wrist tags. These dolls probably have never been played with and the only slight distraction is where the box lids rested on the foreheads cousing slight discoloration. Boxes are marked with original prices.

 Nurse Jane & Uncle Wiggly by Georgene Novelties, Inc.
A fantastic set from the 1940s with Nurse Jane still retaining her original box and both dolls having their original paper tags! These dolls were never played with and the coloring in fabric is bright and unsoiled. Nurse Jane is marked on the tag & box with her original price... 2.98 dollars. A most appealing pair, one would be hard pressed to find another pair in this condition.
A fantastic set from the 1940s with Nurse Jane still retaining her original box and both dolls having their original paper tags! These dolls were never played with and the coloring in fabric is bright and unsoiled. Nurse Jane is marked on the tag & box with her original price... 2.98 dollars. A most appealing pair, one would be hard pressed to find another pair in this condition.

  Mason & Taylor Fully Wood Doll
Produced in 1880s in Vermont this fully jointed wood body doll has cast metall feet and hands. The finely molded head has painted fitures and blond hair. These doll were usualy heavily played with and seldom does one have the opportunity to purchase one in fine original untouched condition

Produced in 1880s in Vermont this fully jointed wood body doll has cast metall feet and hands. The finely molded head has painted fitures and blond hair. These doll were usualy heavily played with and seldom does one have the opportunity to purchase one in fine original untouched condition




The earliest dolls brought to America from Europe are English wooden dolls of the type in illustration 18. However, only the most affluent would have such a doll. Many of the "homegrown" dolls of America's first two centuries, simple wooden dolls made by a father's hand or rag dolls from a mother's needle have not survived. However, by the nineteenth century, advances in technology coupled with a burgeoning middle class and a change in attitude toward childhood as a special time in life resulted in dolls from Europe arriving in this country in unprecedented numbers. By the end of the century, American women were already at the forefront of collecting dolls as a hobby, an interest which expanded in the twentieth century to the formation of doll clubs. Records tell of 19th century exhibitions of dolls, many held to raise money for worthy causes (another whole story in itself) and a means by which women could "do good" while doing something that really appealed to them. Many churchwomen also made and dressed dolls to raise money for their church's missionary outreach or pastoral needs. Today these dolls are highly prized and collected both for the handmade appeal and their historical significance.

The first organized group of doll collectors was incorporated in 1936 as the Doll Collectors of America. Meeting monthly in the Boston area, these stalwart women recognized the historical significance of dolls and, being dedicated to research and education, mandated for themselves publication on a regular basis. Their early works, The Doll Collectors' Manuals, long out of print, are even today prized for their valuable content. The thirst for research and knowledge of their collections, many of which were family dolls, treasured and left by their mothers and grandmothers, led pioneer scholars/collectors such as Janet Johl, Eleanor St. George, and later the Coleman family to produce serious publications. The 1968 Coleman Encyclopedia of Dolls, and the companion 1986 Volume 2, remain the backbone of research. The hobby had reached such proportions that by the 1970s myriad price guides were being published. Today, the most widely used is the Blue Book by Jan Foulke.

A brief chronology of commercially produced antique dolls found in America would begin with English wooden or wax dolls, German papier mache and glazed china (such as on the cover and ill. 7) or unglazed parian dolls. By the 1870s bisque dolls had taken precedence over all others, and the beautiful French Fashion dolls, (ill. 1-5) were not only illustrative of the splendor of the French couturier's hand and industry, but were a child's plaything as well. Every conceivable item that a woman might have in her wardrobe or toilette was duplicated for the doll; elegance and conspicuous consumption were taught to the pampered child through her doll. The bisque doll with the proportions of a child then followed, and the French bebes of Jumeau and Bru (ill. 6, 22) were perhaps the most beautiful of all. German competition with bisque dolls was strong, and led to examples from fine firms such as Kestner, Simon & Halbig, and Handwerck (ill. 12, 13, 15, 16). The French dolls were luxury items when produced and were made in smaller quantities than the German, and remain the more expensive dolls today.